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Oriana's 40th Christmas: Tidings of Joy
5 pm, Sun 10 December 2017
Wesley Uniting Church, Forrest

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Saturday
Oct092010

Alabaster

Saturday 9 and Sunday 10 October 2010
St Paul's Anglican Church, Manuka

 

Poster design by Daniel Sanderson

This exciting concert took its name from Arvo Pärt’s The Woman with the Alabaster Box. The lightness and transparency of ALABASTER is a visual analogue for the strength, clarity and beauty of the sound of many voices singing together. In this wide-ranging programme, Oriana Chorale explored the ways modern and contemporary composers have worked with the most expressive of all musical instruments, the human voice.

The programme included Samuel Barber’s To be sung on the water, Morten Lauridsen’s O magnum mysterium, Herbert Howells’ A spotless rose, Aaron Copland’s Lark and Hope there is, by Clare Maclean.

Music Director David Mackay explained, “The works in this programme could not be more different from each other, but each showcases a particular aspect of the choral sound: Pärt, the clean lines of almost Mediaeval minimalism; Copland, the energetic rhythm of American modernism; Whitacre, the seamless clusters of 21st-century harmony.” The last work is a spectacular setting of e e cummings’ poem I thank You God for most this amazing day.

This was a concert enjoyed by lovers of fine choral music, delighted by these and other examples of glorious harmony for the voice as conceived by composers from six countries.

View the program for this concert | View the Canberra Times review of this concert

Sunday
Mar282010

Songs of Sundrie Natures

Tudor and Jacobean Music by Tallis, Tomkins, Byrd and Gibbons
Saturday 27 and Sunday 28 March 2010

St Paul's Anglican Church, Manuka

 


Poster design by Daniel Sanderson

"Yet let not straingers bragg, nor they these soe commende,
For they may now geve place and sett themselves behynde,
An Englishman, by name, William BIRDE …"

Clerk of Windsor, John Baldwin. c. 1600

Oriana Chorale's first concert of 2010 was of English Tudor and Jacobean music. The programme focused on William Byrd and Thomas Tallis, with extra delights from Orlando Gibbons and Thomas Tomkins.

The works ranged in scale from the lively double-choir celebration O Clap Your Hands by Gibbons to more contemplative works in rich harmony and some all-time favourites of the choral repertoire such as Tallis's O Nata Lux.

At the heart of this musical offering were the towering figures of Tallis and his student William Byrd who later became his collaborator.

The programme explored the relationship between the two composers, which changed with the years and with the political and religious climate of the English court in the 16th century. Oriana Chorale traced their story in both song and the spoken word, and displayed the heritage of music from Tudor England. It explored how the Reformation led to a preference for English words over Latin, and the simpler melodies and harmonies of homophony over the complexities of polyphony.

View the program for this concert | View the Canberra Times review of this concert

Saturday
Apr212007

Oriana turned 30 in 2007

The Oriana Chorale celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2007 with a RESTROSPECTIVE CONCERT on Saturday 21st April.
‘Many of us are just getting it together at thirty; I guess Oriana had it up and running from the word Go!’
- Rowan Harvey-Martin, Mar 2007
 
On 21 April the Oriana Chorale, directed by Rowan Harvey-Martin, reflected on thirty years of fine a cappella singing, innovative programming and inspiring musical offerings to the community.
Performing again at one of its most popular concert venues, the Hall of University House at the Australian National University, the Chorale presented a representative and interesting selection of works recalling highlights of these thirty enjoyable years.
The music represented many sources and centuries. Early composers like Monteverdi and Palestrina rubbed shoulders with the more modern, including Ravel and Messiaen. Many excellent works competed for a place in the program: a few familiar songs by Brahms and excerpts from Rachmaninoff’s Russian settings were sure choices.
Regular followers of the Chorale were delighted to hear these favourites and there was also some territory new to other music-lovers. From the earlier years, for example, the Chorale took pleasure in presenting an arrangement by founding Oriana Chorale director, Roger Wellman, who was present for the occasion.
The Chorale has maintained a strong interest in innovative programming and musical excellence. This concert reminded us of so many marvellous occasions in the past, and of so many good friends who have sung with us over the years.
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